Compulsion to Create
Gregory S. Shaffer
CTC Home
CTC Services
Workshops
Public speaking
Published work
Unpublished Work
Writing Services
Philosophy
Biographical Sketch
Resume
References and Clients
Contact Info


Putting Your Stories into Public Speaking
This workshop provides a practical approach to joining the ranks of effective public speakers who know how and when to use stories.

WHO IS THIS FOR?
This workshop is for those who wish to incorporate the telling of stories into their public speaking, as well as those who want to improve their ability to use the telling of stories as an effective communication tool.

WHAT IS IT FOR?
Few people, when they sit down to outline a message they will deliver — be it to one person or a large group — think critically about how to use stories to help illustrate their message. To make your point, what you say must be memorable, and stories assist in placing your message in the minds of your audience. This workshop forms a basis for shaping and telling stories, be they your personal stories or stories of others. The beginning and advanced public speaking student alike can benefit from this workshop.

HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT?
Participants benefit from an optimal learning environment that combines challenging exercises (high expectations) in a safe (low threat/high support) environment. In addition, participants will be:

  • introduced to new storytelling techniques;
  • afforded the opportunity to practice storytelling in "bite size" pieces;
  • given the confidence that comes from knowing how to tell a story and when not to use stories to communicate a point.

WHAT COMPETENCIES WILL BE DEALT WITH?
Storytelling Building Blocks: A step-by-step model for developing your story is presented and practiced. Start with an idea and end with an important part of a public address. Building blocks include: use of emotion, pausing, dialogue, rhythm, "voice music" and effective conclusions.

Capitalizing on Your Strengths — Minimizing Your Weaknesses: We are all better at some aspects of telling a story than others. Knowing which are which is essential to effective public speaking and leads to the proper utilization of skills and talents.

Taking Control/Projecting Confidence: How often have you heard or said yourself, "I'm a terrible storyteller"? The fact is that unconfident, hesitant speakers are unpleasant to watch, so we look away. You will learn key steps for sharing your information in a self-assured manner, thus focusing the attention on what you have to say and not how you are saying it.

Knowing and Setting the Stage: Learn how to access the environment in which storytelling will work and what you can do to foster that environment to allow for the clear reception of your message.

Making Your Point: First, you must clearly understand the point you wish to make, then you must "package" your message in a way that holds value and interest for the listener.

Brief Review of the Public Speaking Toolbox: (As time allows, this material is covered in depth in other workshops.) Toolbox includes: use of gestures, facial expressions, eye contact, rate of delivery, effective use of pauses, sound effects (ones that you make, not taped) and body language. Vocal aspects of presenting include: volume, pitch, tone, projection, pacing, diction and how to make your breath work for you.

THE WORKSHOP WILL ENABLE YOU TO:

  • assess your current skill level;
  • understand the parts of the story;
  • determine how to make your stories work for you;
  • decide when to use your stories versus the stories of others;
  • implement a step-by-step model for developing your stories;
  • have developed stories at the ready;
  • identify new skills you wish to acquire in the future and develop steps to acquire those skills;
  • gain greater overall confidence in your public speaking.

SPECIFIC CONTENT
The specific information taught and the timing and sequencing of workshop components are dictated by time, participants' current real-life work situations and individual needs and goals. The content is determined based on

pre-workshop discussions with those coordinating the workshop and, when possible, workshop participants.

DO I NEED THIS WORKSHOP?
You are invited to contact me to discuss your needs, skills and objectives as they relate to this workshop.

HOW IS THE WORKSHOP STRUCTURED?
Workshop structure is based on instructional time available and desired goals. Content is provided to ground participants in thoughts and vocabulary about specific public speaking topics and skill sets. For each content area, group discussion is followed by individual and/or small group practice.

HOW LONG IS THE WORKSHOP?
Participants benefit, when possible, from a multi-day workshop, which covers areas of specific interest in greater depth. Multi-day workshops can be held consecutively or over a longer time period. A one-day workshop is available, which covers the basics of the content discussed above.

HOW MANY PARTICIPANTS ARE IN EACH WORKSHOP?
The workshop works best with six to ten participants. In most cases, a minimum of four participants are needed to provide the synergistic effect of learning from each other. Groups of three or smaller benefit more from an open discussion-style workshop, which can be provided. A workable maximum for the workshop is twelve participants.

Return to Workshop List

Copyright 1998-2002 compulsion to Create